Oh Baby!
red-lipstick:

Ralph Crane aka Ralph Rudy Crane (German, 1913-1988) - Owners With Their Black Cats, Waiting In Line For Audition In Movie “Tales Of Terror”, 1961 (Life Magazine)

red-lipstick:

Ralph Crane aka Ralph Rudy Crane (German, 1913-1988) - Owners With Their Black Cats, Waiting In Line For Audition In Movie “Tales Of Terror”, 1961 (Life Magazine)

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

portraits-of-america:

     “I was a freshman in high school and she was in eighth grade when the Beatles hit. There was just something about that time: there was folk music, the Civil Rights Movement, the sexual revolution, Woodstock, the Kingston Trio, the anti-Vietnam War protests, and a lot of excellent live music. Most guys wanted a guitar and to play in a garage band. It was a period of six or seven years that was completely different. I graduated from high school in 1967. The people who graduated just a year before us in 1966 were considered old—a whole different generation!”     “I recently went to our high school reunion. I ran into a guy who had a locker next to me, but we never really talked a lot back then—just ‘hi‘ and ‘how are you’. We sat down and talked for four hours! And he said, ‘You know, I don’t have as much in common with the younger guys I work with, than with you because we went through those times together.’ There’s definitely a connection between the people who grew up during that time. You meet someone, and—without even realizing why—you click right away because of that common experience: the history you share that you don’t have with a lot of others.”     “But I think—I can’t even tell you why, but I feel it—that the group of kids that are just coming in now will be like our generation. They’re not going to care about money as much as education, the person next to them, all the inequalities that exist, and bettering the world.”
 
Green Bay, WI

portraits-of-america:

     “I was a freshman in high school and she was in eighth grade when the Beatles hit. There was just something about that time: there was folk music, the Civil Rights Movement, the sexual revolution, Woodstock, the Kingston Trio, the anti-Vietnam War protests, and a lot of excellent live music. Most guys wanted a guitar and to play in a garage band. It was a period of six or seven years that was completely different. I graduated from high school in 1967. The people who graduated just a year before us in 1966 were considered old—a whole different generation!”
     “I recently went to our high school reunion. I ran into a guy who had a locker next to me, but we never really talked a lot back then—just ‘hi‘ and ‘how are you’. We sat down and talked for four hours! And he said, ‘You know, I don’t have as much in common with the younger guys I work with, than with you because we went through those times together.’ There’s definitely a connection between the people who grew up during that time. You meet someone, and—without even realizing why—you click right away because of that common experience: the history you share that you don’t have with a lot of others.”
     “But I think—I can’t even tell you why, but I feel it—that the group of kids that are just coming in now will be like our generation. They’re not going to care about money as much as education, the person next to them, all the inequalities that exist, and bettering the world.”

 

Green Bay, WI

getsby:

y’all are like “ooh everyone is beautiful” “ooh everyone deserves to feel hot” and then three seconds later you’re making fun of people who cover their acne with makeup and people who haven’t mastered winged eyeliner yet like grow the hell up you don’t get to pick and choose times to be body positive

The Rio Caño Cristales - most colorful river (caused by algae and moss seen through the water), Colombia.

beben-eleben:

Alex McLean, a licensed pilot and photographer, took these gorgeous photos “just by sticking his camera out the window”.

immolatrix:

shannonwest:

equalityandthecity:

(via Students help Emma Sulkowicz carry mattress to class in first collective carry)

Y E S 

holy shit thats a powerful photo
whippit-princess:

lasso:



Guys seriously would you LOOK at mini Adam Scott from Boy Meets World circa 1994



was this when he was mayor

whippit-princess:

lasso:

Guys seriously would you LOOK at mini Adam Scott from Boy Meets World circa 1994

was this when he was mayor

papermagazine:

Paper: What is the biggest obstacle you’ve had to overcome in your career?
Cindy Sherman: Male artists.
More from our September issue OGs feature on Cindy Sherman here.

papermagazine:

Paper: What is the biggest obstacle you’ve had to overcome in your career?

Cindy Sherman: Male artists.

More from our September issue OGs feature on Cindy Sherman here.

papermagazine:

For our 30th anniversary, we celebrate 37 artists, visionaries, icons and iconoclasts. See the pictures and interviews with our OG’s here.

papermagazine:

For our 30th anniversary, we celebrate 37 artists, visionaries, icons and iconoclasts. See the pictures and interviews with our OG’s here.

20aliens:

Rineke Dijkstra

20aliens:

Rineke Dijkstra

zeelsama:

Dascha Polanco attends the Rolando Santana Fashion Show at NYFW

im gonna pass out

omggggggg